Eco-Village Neighbors – Please collect and eat the guyaba and feijoa which are both producing lots of fruit right now. Both trees are at the Bimini Terrace.

Guyaba, also called yellow guava (tree in back)

Guyaba, also called yellow guava (tree in back)

The guyaba is in front, at the very northeast corner – near the sidewalk (in the middle of where I garden.) Guyaba should be picked from the tree when the fruit is nearly all yellow (can still be greenish in parts – but not too green – solidly green ones won’t ripen off the tree.) Sometimes you can find it on the ground, but it’s often bruised and bug-eaten by then. The guyabas are ripe when they turn fully yellow – it’s generally a day or so after picking. The skin and flesh are all edible and very tender, but the seeds are like rocks. It’s sweet, but not too sweet – really good. They spoil pretty quickly, though, so don’t let them sit around. A lot of passersby like to pick these – if you see folks picking them, I’d suggest approaching them and asking them not to. People picking have been breaking branches on the tree and tromping through the garden. It’s actually kind of a nuisance – there are areas of the garden that I just can’t plant in from now until the guyaba season ends in early December.

Feijoa, also called pineapple guava

Feijoa, also called pineapple guava

The feijoa tree is in the back, right behind Somer and Aurisha’s unit. For harvesting these, I generally pick fallen fruit off the ground. There’s a lot out there on the ground right now. I just picked up a dozen and there’s more to be collected (and if you don’t, the bugs will!) If you don’t see any on the ground, shake the tree very gently. Fallen feijoa take a few days to ripen. They’re edible when they fall off the tree, but, in 2-5 days, the skin changes color subtly – turning from a more blue-green to a more yellow-green. As they ripen, they become less tart, and a little more sweet, tender and juicy. I trim off the flower petals on the end, then eat them skin and all.  There are seeds in there, but you won’t notice them. I cut up a couple and put them in my cereal in the morning. Some folks like to remove all the skin them (takes more work, and, my hunch is, makes them slightly less nutritious,) which makes them a bit sweeter, as the skin is a little tart. Their yielding season is nearly over; it starts here around August and goes though October.

The guyabas are especially big and good this year – just ask Homegrown Evolution.

Ay! One more note – and I don’t have a photo, nor do I know good instructions for harvesting and eating these. but the sapote (also called custard apple) are also in season. The tree is also at the Bimini Terrace – above the lizard bench.

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